ONTOLOGY REPORT - ANNOTATIONS


Term:neonatal myasthenia gravis
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Accession:DOID:14043 term browser browse the term
Definition:A disorder of neuromuscular transmission that occurs in a minority of newborns born to women with myasthenia gravis. Clinical features are usually present at birth or develop in the first 3 days of life and consist of hypotonia and impaired respiratory, suck, and swallowing abilities. This condition is associated with the passive transfer of acetylcholine receptor antibodies through the placenta. In the majority of infants the myasthenic weakness resolves (i.e., transient neonatal myasthenia gravis) although this disorder may rarely continue beyond the neonatal period (i.e., persistent neonatal myasthenia gravis). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p823; Neurology 1997 Jan;48(1):50-4)
Synonyms:exact_synonym: Antenatal Myasthenia Gravis;   Persistent Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis;   Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis
 primary_id: MESH:D020941;   RDO:0007448
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Term Annotations click to browse term
  disease 14920
    disease of anatomical entity 14086
      musculoskeletal system disease 3997
        autoimmune disease of musculoskeletal system 823
          myasthenia gravis 30
            neonatal myasthenia gravis 0
Path 2
Term Annotations click to browse term
  disease 14920
    disease of anatomical entity 14086
      Immune & Inflammatory Diseases 3003
        immune system disease 2425
          Autoimmune Diseases 1455
            autoimmune hypersensitivity disease 1169
              autoimmune disease of the nervous system 402
                autoimmune disease of peripheral nervous system 46
                  myasthenia gravis 30
                    neonatal myasthenia gravis 0
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