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Ontology Browser

Term:
Parent Terms Term With Siblings Child Terms
bile duct disease +     
cholestasis +     
Aagenaes syndrome 
Absent Duct of Santorini 
Acrorenal Mandibular Syndrome 
Acrorenal Syndrome Recessive 
ampulla of Vater neoplasm +  
Anorectal Malformations +   
ARC syndrome +   
Barrett's esophagus +   
Bile Duct Neoplasms +   
biliary atresia +   
Progressive destruction or the absence of all or part of the extrahepatic BILE DUCTS, resulting in the complete obstruction of BILE flow. Usually, biliary atresia is found in infants and accounts for one third of the neonatal cholestatic JAUNDICE.
Cholangiofibrosis  
cholangitis +   
choledochal cyst +   
cholestasis +   
Cholestasis with Gallstone, Ataxia, and Visual Disturbance 
Cholesterol Pneumonia 
COACH syndrome  
common bile duct disease +   
congenital bile acid synthesis defect +   
Craniosynostosis, Anal Anomalies, and Porokeratosis 
Currarino syndrome  
diaphragmatic eventration +   
esophageal atresia +   
extrahepatic bile duct lipoma 
extrahepatic cholestasis  
fascioliasis  
GRACILE syndrome  
Hardikar Syndrome 
Hirschsprung's disease +   
intestinal atresia +   
intrahepatic cholestasis +   
Lutz Richner Landolt Syndrome 
Meckel's diverticulum 
Mirizzi Syndrome 
obstructive jaundice +   
Pancreaticobiliary Maljunction 
perforation of bile duct 
Volvulus Of Midgut  

Synonyms
Exact Synonyms: Atresia of bile duct ;   Congenital biliary atresia ;   Extrahepatic Biliary Atresia ;   Extrahepatic Biliary Atresias ;   Familial Extrahepatic Biliary Atresia ;   Idiopathic Extrahepatic Biliary Atresia
Primary IDs: MESH:D001656
Alternate IDs: OMIM:210500 ;   RDO:0004373
Xrefs: GARD:12010 ;   ICD10CM:Q44.2 ;   ICD9CM:751.61 ;   NCI:C34421 ;   ORDO:30391
Definition Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biliary_atresia "DO", http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000215.htm "DO", MESH:D001656

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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.