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Relevance of tissue factor and tissue factor pathway inhibitor for hypercoagulable state in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Authors: Fujii, M  Hayakawa, H  Urano, T  Sato, A  Chida, K  Nakamura, H  Takada, A 
Citation: Fujii M, etal., Thromb Res. 2000 Jul 15;99(2):111-7.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:10946084

We investigated the role of tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was obtained from 22 patients with IPF, and the levels of TF and TFPI antigen were measured by ELISA. The TF and TFPI levels in BAL fluid supernatant were significantly higher in IPF patients than in normal controls. In addition, both levels were significantly higher in advanced cases than in nonadvanced cases. There was a significant correlation between the TF and TFPI levels. Localization of TF and TFPI antigens was investigated by immunohistochemical staining. Both antigens were mainly localized in hyperplastic cuboidal epithelial cells, suggesting that the widespread distribution of these cells contributed to the increase of TF and TFPI antigen levels in the lungs of IPF patients. To assess whether TF activity is counterbalanced by TFPI in the lungs of IPF patients, we examined procoagulant activity and TF activity. It was found, however, that both procoagulant and TF activities were significantly higher in the BAL fluid supernatant of IPF patients than in that of normal controls, which suggested that TFPI was actually increased, but the increase was insufficient to counterbalance TF, leading to the development of a hypercoagulable state in the lungs of IPF patients.

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CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 11060143
Created: 2016-04-19
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2016-04-19
Status: ACTIVE



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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.