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Bushen Huoxue decoction improves cognitive decline in rats with cerebral hypoperfusion.

Authors: Ye, S  Gu, Y  Xu, Y  Fan, W  Wang, X  Chen, S  Cai, S  Lv, S  Tong, Y  Cai, J 
Citation: Ye S, etal., Mol Med Rep. 2014 Sep;10(3):1635-41. doi: 10.3892/mmr.2014.2355. Epub 2014 Jun 26.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:24968700
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.3892/mmr.2014.2355

Cerebral hypoperfusion is a common feature of vascular dementia and has recently been recognized to contribute to the progression of cognitive decline. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Bushen Huoxue decoction (BHD), a twoherb Chinese Medicine, on cognitive impairment in a rat model of cerebral hypoperfusion induced by permanent occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries (2VO). The results demonstrated that BHD significantly attenuated learning and spatial memory deficits in the Morris water maze test in a dosedependent manner. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the reduction of synapse density in hippocampal CA1 and cortex parietal isolated from rats with 2VO was partially restored by BHD treatment. In addition, the expression levels of a number of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT), glutathine and glutathione peroxidase1 (GPx1) increased, whereas malondialdehyde decreased in the hippocampi of rats with 2VO following BHD treatment. Polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis further confirmed that the GPx1 and CAT expression increased in the BHD treatment group. In conclusion the results suggested that BHD has therapeutic potential to treat vascular dementia, which may be associated with synapse density and antioxidant activities in the hippocampus.

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CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 11352822
Created: 2016-07-20
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2016-07-20
Status: ACTIVE



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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.