Submit Data |  Help |  Video Tutorials |  News |  Publications |  FTP Download |  REST API |  Citing RGD |  Contact   

The expression of dystrophin, alpha-sarcoglycan, and beta-dystroglycan during skeletal muscle regeneration: immunohistochemical and western blot studies.

Authors: Hoshino, S  Ohkoshi, N  Ishii, A  Shoji, S 
Citation: Hoshino S, etal., Acta Histochem. 2002;104(2):139-47.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:12086334

We evaluated re-expression of dystrophin, alpha-sarcoglycan and beta-dystroglycan in regenerating skeletal muscles of rats after cardiotoxin-induced myonecrosis in order to understand the dynamic behaviour of these proteins during the regeneration process. Immunohistochemical staining of these proteins almost disappeared in the sarcolemma of necrotic fibers on the 1st day, and was obscured due to non-specific staining on the 3rd day. Dystrophin was labeled faintly at the sarcolemma of regenerating muscle fibers on the 5th day. From the 5th day to the 10th day, levels of immunostaining of dystrophin increased. After the 14th day, dystrophin was stained conspicuously. alpha-Sarcoglycan was labeled weakly at the sarcolemma of small regenerating muscle fibers on the 5th day and was labeled conspicuously after the 7th day. beta-Dystroglycan was labeled moderately at the sarcolemma of regenerating muscle fibers on the 5th day and was labeled conspicuously after the 7th day. In western blot analysis, beta-dystroglycan persisted throughout the entire cycle of myonecrosis and regeneration, and re-expression of alpha-sarcoglycan progressed faster than that of dystrophin. We speculate that regeneration advances from the basement membrane side to the subsarcolemmal side, and that proteins at the basement membrane side resist disruption and have a high capacity for regeneration.

Annotation

Gene Ontology Annotations
Objects Annotated

Additional Information

 
CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 11541049
Created: 2016-10-06
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2016-10-06
Status: ACTIVE



NHLBI Logo

RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.