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An insertion/deletion polymorphism in the alpha2B adrenoceptor gene is associated with age at onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Authors: Papazoglou, D  Papanas, N  Papatheodorou, K  Kotsiou, S  Christakidis, D  Maltezos, E 
Citation: Papazoglou D, etal., Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 2006 Sep;114(8):424-7.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:17039423
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1055/s-2006-924330

Alpha2B adrenoceptor (alpha2B-AR) mediates a variety of functions, including insulin secretion. An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the alpha2B-AR gene located on chromosome 2 has recently been described. The aim of the present study was to examine if there is a difference in the D allele frequency of alpha2B-AR gene between type 2 diabetic patients and controls, as well as to ascertain whether the D allele confers an increased risk for earlier onset of diabetes. This study included 199 type 2 diabetic patients and 204 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Genotyping of I/D polymorphism was performed by PCR. No significant difference in the D allele frequency was observed between the two groups (22.1% vs. 19.1%, p = 0.409). Among type 2 diabetic patients, however, presence of the D allele was associated with significantly younger age at onset of diabetes (51.4+/-8.6 vs. 59.2+/-9.7 years, p < 0.001). Multiple stepwise linear regression identified alpha2B I/D genotype as an independent predictor of age at onset of DMT2, explaining 14.3% of its variance. This result indicates that the D allele may be implicated in impaired glucose metabolism leading to earlier manifestation of diabetes in predisposed subjects.

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CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 2313544
Created: 2009-09-30
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2009-09-30
Status: ACTIVE



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