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Urinary nerve growth factor level in children with neurogenic bladder due to myelomeningocele.

Authors: Korzeniecka-Kozerska, A  Porowski, T  Michaluk-Skutnik, J  Wasilewska, A  Plonski, G 
Citation: Korzeniecka-Kozerska A, etal., Scand J Urol. 2013 Jan 10.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:23301927
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.3109/00365599.2012.752402

Abstract Objective. Myelomeningocele is the most common physically disabling birth defect in humans. It is caused by the failure of the neural tube to close and is most common in the lumbosacral area. Because of associated neurogenic bladder dysfunction, children with myelomeningocele have an increased risk of urinary tract infections and, ultimately, of kidney damage. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is an important mediator inducing bladder overactivity in many pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate urinary NGF excretion in children with neurogenic bladder caused by myelomeningocele. Material and methods. The investigation was conducted into two groups. Group 1 comprised 28 children with neurogenic bladder, and group 2 comprised 20 healthy children with no abnormalities in the urinary and nervous systems. Urinary NGF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Median urinary NGF concentration in group 1 was higher when compared with healthy controls. Positive correlations between urinary NGF level and detrusor pressure at maximum bladder capacity, and negative correlations between NGF and bladder wall compliance were found. Conclusions. Urinary NGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with myelomeningocele. Future studies are needed to examine further the significance of urinary NGF levels in the pathogenesis of neurogenic bladder in this clinical condition.

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CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 7242771
Created: 2013-04-22
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2013-04-22
Status: ACTIVE



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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.