Assessment of the expression of IRbeta, IRS-1, IRS-2 and IGF-IRbeta in a rat model of intrauterine growth restriction.

Authors: Bueno, MP  Guadagnini, D  Goncalves, FL  Barini, R  Saad, MJ  Schmidt, AF  Sbragia, L 
Citation: Bueno MP, etal., Fetal Diagn Ther. 2010;28(3):145-52. doi: 10.1159/000316932. Epub 2010 Aug 19.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:20720385
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1159/000316932

OBJECTIVE: To investigate glomerular development and expression of insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptors in an experimental model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied three groups of Sprague-Dawley fetuses: IUGR - restricted by ligation of the right uterine artery; C-IUGR - left horn controls, and EC - external controls (non-manipulated). Body and organs were weighed, and glomerular number and volume were analyzed. Expression of IRbeta, IRS-1, IRS-2 and IGF-IRbeta was analyzed in liver, intestine and kidneys by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Organ/body weight ratios were similar. In IUGR, glomerular number and volume were increased compared to C-IUGR and EC (p<0.001). In the IUGR liver, increases were found in IGF-IRbeta compared to C-IUGR and EC; IRbeta compared to EC, and IRS-2 compared to C-IUGR. However, decreases in IRbeta were noted in IUGR compared to C-IUGR; IRS-1 compared to C-IUGR and EC, and IRS-2 compared to EC. In IUGR intestine, increases were detected in IRbeta, IRS-1 and IGF-IRbeta compared to C-IUGR and EC. In IUGR kidneys, increases were observed in IRbeta and IGF-IRbeta compared to C-IUGR and EC, and IRS-1 compared to EC. Decreased IRS-2 in the intestine and kidney were noticed in IUGR compared to C-IUGR and EC. CONCLUSION: IUGR fetuses had less glomeruli and alterations in insulin receptors, which may be associated with an increased risk of disease occurrence in adulthood.

Annotation

Disease Annotations
Objects Annotated

Additional Information

 
CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 7257699
Created: 2013-08-30
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2013-08-30
Status: ACTIVE



NHLBI Logo

RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.