Role of complement 3a in the growth of mesangial cells from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

Authors: Ikeda, K  Fukuda, N  Ueno, T  Endo, M  Kobayashi, N  Soma, M  Matsumoto, K 
Citation: Ikeda K, etal., Clin Exp Hypertens. 2013 May 28.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:23713944
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.3109/10641963.2013.789042

Abstract Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) show exaggerated growth with a synthetic phenotype and angiotensin II (Ang II) production associated with increased production of complement (C3). We hypothesized that C3 is involved in the growth of mesangial cells (MCs) from hypertensive rats. We examined the effects of a C3a receptor inhibitor on proliferation, phenotype and Ang II generation in MCs from stroke prone-spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)-SP, SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Expression of C3 and C3a receptor were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of the renal cortex. We examined the effects of the C3a inhibitor, SB290157, on proliferation, the expression of phenotype-marker mRNAs and Ang II production in cells from SHR-SP, SHR and WKY rats. Immunostaining of C3 was stronger in SHR and SHRSP glomeruli. MCs from SHR-SP and SHR abundantly express pre-pro C3 mRNA. SB290157 significantly inhibited basal DNA synthesis and proliferation of MCs from SHR-SP and SHR. Expression of osteopontin mRNA in MCs from SHR-SP and SHR was decreased with SB290157 treatment, whereas MC basal expression of alpha-SMA mRNA was decreased. SB290157 significantly decreased the production of Ang II in MCs from SHR-SP and SHR. Endogenous C3a promotes exaggerated growth with a synthetic phenotype and the production of Ang II in MCs from SHR-SP and SHR. The C3 and C3a receptor system may primarily be involved in the pathogenesis of renal remodeling in hypertensive rats.

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CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 7411623
Created: 2013-11-14
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2013-11-14
Status: ACTIVE



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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.