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Long-term and age-dependent restoration of visual function in a mouse model of CNGB3-associated achromatopsia following gene therapy.

Authors: Carvalho, LS  Xu, J  Pearson, RA  Smith, AJ  Bainbridge, JW  Morris, LM  Fliesler, SJ  Ding, XQ  Ali, RR 
Citation: Carvalho LS, etal., Hum Mol Genet. 2011 Aug 15;20(16):3161-75. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddr218. Epub 2011 May 15.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:21576125
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddr218

Mutations in the CNGB3 gene account for >50% of all known cases of achromatopsia. Although of early onset, its stationary character and the potential for rapid assessment of restoration of retinal function following therapy renders achromatopsia a very attractive candidate for gene therapy. Here we tested the efficacy of an rAAV2/8 vector containing a human cone arrestin promoter and a human CNGB3 cDNA in CNGB3 deficient mice. Following subretinal delivery of the vector, CNGB3 was detected in both M- and S-cones and resulted in increased levels of CNGA3, increased cone density and survival, improved cone outer segment structure and normal subcellular compartmentalization of cone opsins. Therapy also resulted in long-term improvement of retinal function, with restoration of cone ERG amplitudes of up to 90% of wild-type and a significant improvement in visual acuity. Remarkably, successful restoration of cone function was observed even when treatment was initiated at 6 months of age; however, restoration of normal visual acuity was only possible in younger animals (e.g. 2-4 weeks old). This study represents achievement of the most substantial restoration of visual function reported to date in an animal model of achromatopsia using a human gene construct, which has the potential to be utilized in clinical trials.

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CRRD Object Information
CRRD ID: 9068450
Created: 2014-08-19
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2014-08-19
Status: ACTIVE



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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.